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Theodoor van Loon was one of the first painters from the Southern Netherlands to be deeply influenced by the art of Caravaggio. Like his contemporary Rubens, Van Loon developed a powerful, original style and throughout the whole of his career he remains marked by the Italian masters.


For the very first time this exhibition brings you into contact with the work of this atypical artist. By placing his paintings alongside those of his contemporaries (Rubens, Barocci, Bloemaert) the show reveals the particular role Van Loon played in his era.

Did you know?

  • Ichographs, a project by Yiannis Kranidiotis

    The winners of the first BOZAR Lab call for projects are known

    In 2017 BOZAR LAB issued an open call for innovative companies, start-ups, artists and researchers to reflect on how new technologies and applications could add to the experience of the exhibition Theodoor van Loon.

    read more
    — published on
  • Download the audio guide for the Theodoor van Loon exhibition on the BOZAR App

    Immerse yourself in the sounds and images of Van loon and his world.

    read more
    — published on
  • Istvan Farkas, Coffehouse Scene, c. 1922. St. Stephe,’s King Museum - Deak Collection, Szekesfehervar

    Make the most of your visit with the Fall Pass!

    read more
    — published on
  • Restoration of five paintings by Theodoor van Loon

    On the occasion of the very first retrospective of the work of the Flemish Baroque painter Theodoor van Loon, several major works have undergone a thorough restoration, revealing their original colours and splendour. A fantastic opportunity to discover his work this autumn in Brussels!

    — published on
  • 5 + 1 reasons to visit the exhibition on Theodoor van Loon

    — published on
  • Cachivache Bugui Bugui

    Visual artist and all-round musician Joris Van de Moortel has drawn inspiration from the formal excesses of the baroque period for his solo exhibition Cachivache Bugui Bugui.

    — published on
  • Saving Van Loon

    For about 6 months, art restorer Isabelle Happart has had her nose pressed up daily against a painting of Theodoor van Loon, patiently saving it from the ravages of time.

    — published on
  • Van Loon in the wild

    You may be surprised to learn that not all of Theodoor van Loon’s works currently grace the walls of the Centre of Fine Arts. Some can still be observed in their natural habitat, like in the quirky place of pilgrimage that is Scherpenheuvel. Van Loon’s monumental paintings have recently been cleaned and will be enhanced by a magnificent soundtrack, during an in situ concert.

    — published on

Ongoing and forthcoming

Previously