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From 17 to 21 January, BOZAR will be launching the Bridges Festival, devoted to the cinema of countries on Europe's eastern fringes; to the cinematographic treasures that emerged following the collapse of the Soviet Union as these formerly federated republics gained access to independence. 

The triple programming sheds the spotlight on a region from which we usually see very few filmed works. First there is Ukraine, of course, with its militant cinema. An active and exciting artistic world since 2010 -  and especially since 2014 and the Euromaidan Revolution. Then there is Georgia with its social and introspective cinema, contemplating family life, landscapes and traditions threatened by the opening up of borders. Finally, a section devoted to the more modest film production of various other countries in this outlying region, from Belarus to Armenia. 

These countries now unshackled from Soviet aesthetic and ideological domination draw their cultural identity from a past that bridges Europe and Russia. One that is particularly rich in interactions and cultural exchanges. A unique chance to discover on the big screen a little known cinema in the presence of its filmmakers. 

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