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In Morocco today young feminist voices are to be heard in a country whose literary traditions stretch back over centuries. BOZAR has extended an invitation to three socially committed Moroccan authoresses in what is also a tribute to the country's multilingualism and diversity. The writers will engage in conversation and present excerpts of their work. A work that contradicts stereotypes, taboos and expectations regarding gender, the female body and sexuality. What role did women play in the Arab revolution? And how is this reflected in contemporary Moroccan literature?

Sanaa el Aji has several books to her name, including the novel Majnounatou Youssef (2003). Her work is also included in anthologies, notably Lettres à un jeune marocain (Le Seuil, 2009), Couverture de la diversité dans les médias marocains (2009) and Femmes et religions (2014). She is also a doctor of sociology. In 2017, she published her thesis Sexualité et célibat au Maroc.
Karima Ahdad is a writer and journalist, originally from the Rif region. She has worked for Moroccan newspapers including Al Massae and Akhbar Alyaoum and for international websites such as DW Arabic and Maghreb voices. She often writes on feminist subjects. Her first novel, Banat Assabbar, which takes place in the town of Al Hoceima, is an ode to the emancipation of women in a conservative environment where tensions run high.  
Fedwa Misk is a doctor, freelance journalist and cultural worker. She organises literary events in Casablanca, Rabat and El Jadida. She published her first novel Capharnaüm in 2012. In 2015, her personal tribute to Fatima Mernissi was read and recited by the actress Sophia Hadi in the National Library.