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“Vogue Take Ovah - the Old Way and New Way Experience”.

For All Queens! takes you on a journey from eighties New York to modern-day Brussels. Keith Haring loved to party, and Afro-American culture and dance were his lifeblood. Club culture was a lifestyle to him. The House Ball culture embodied an almost spiritual experience. For All Queens! is deeply connected to this underground ballroom community: a culture with such themes as race, gender and sexual orientation at its heart. The ‘(new way) vogue’ is just one of the forms of expression that have arisen from it. Recent Netflix series such as Pose and Paris is Burning offer a fresh look at this phenomenon. This special evening will also pay homage to the club culture and the LGBTQI+ icons that inspired Haring then and continue to fascinate us today, thirty years after the death of this iconic American artist. You won’t want to miss this club vibe at BOZAR!

The voguing performance is followed by a Q&A with Julia Gruen (executive director of the Keith Haring Foundation and the artist’s former Studio Manager), Zelda Fitzgerald (For All Queens! and creator of Vogue Take Ovah), Kevin Aviance (American drag queen, musician, fashion designer and vogue and ballroom legend).

Programme

20:00- Vogue take ovah

21:30- Q&A with Zelda Fitzgerald, Kevin Aviance et Julia Gruen.

22:00- DJ

23:00– The end

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Q&A – panel discussion on the artistic process behind Vogue Take Ovah, reflecting on the era and context of Keith Haring and a look at the current situation in Brussels.​​​​​​​

Did you know?

  • Keith Haring and the NY club scene

    The Art of the Party

    When Keith Haring arrived in New York at the end of the 1970s it was a very different place from what it is today. The decade had been extremely volatile economically and the city was pretty much bankrupt. The millionaires still swanned around Central Park uptown but downtown neighbourhoods like the East Village were derelict , dangerous and undesirable. Cheap rents made it a magnet for the young, the liberal and the artistic, and Keith Haring and his friends ticked al of those boxes:

    — published on

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