RADAR

Fantastic Beasts

And we know Where to Find Them. Our exhibition Prints in the Age of Bruegel is positively teeming with them! From the (almost) scientifically accurate to the mythological; sometimes hiding in a corner, sometimes taking centre stage. So let’s go on a safari through the 16th century imagination.

Curator Maarten Bassens on Dürer’s famous 'Rhinoceros' | Interview
Michiel Coxie © kbr
Michiel Coxie © kbr

The stuff of literal nightmares. This makes Snakes on a Plane seem like a relaxing concept.

Cornelis Metsys (d'après/naar/after Raphaël / Rafaël /Raphael) © kbr
Cornelis Metsys (d'après/naar/after Raphaël / Rafaël /Raphael) © kbr

These magnificent water birds are definitely in the mood for a fishy snack.

Pieter van der Heyden (d'après / naar / after Pieter Bruegel) © kbr
Pieter van der Heyden (d'après / naar / after Pieter Bruegel) © kbr

Hieronymous Bosch was responsible for a real craze for delightfully strange creatures. This bellicose chap is one of our favourites.

Frans Huys © kbr
Frans Huys © kbr

Let’s ignore the strange monkeylike cat lapping up its milk and concentrate instead on the cute grumpy doggy hiding in the luth mender’s sack.

Pieter van der Borcht © kbr
Pieter van der Borcht © kbr

Nothing to see here. Just some monkeys ice skating.

Joannes & Lucas Van Doetecum (d'après / naar : after Allart Duhameel) © kbr
Joannes & Lucas Van Doetecum (d'après / naar : after Allart Duhameel) © kbr

As if an elephant wasn’t imposing enough already, this one is carrying a fantastical warship and is under siege!

Hieronymus Wierix (d'après / naar / after Johannes Stradanus) © kbr
Hieronymus Wierix (d'après / naar / after Johannes Stradanus) © kbr

A right royal behind: an impressive specimen of Apulian Breed from the stable of Don Juan of Austria.

Too many cooks may spoil the broth, and too many opinions make governing impossible. Allegory from 1578.

See also