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Paco Cao

Paco Cao

Paco Cao creatie

Paco Cao

Paco Cao

Paco Cao creatie


In de nooit eerder vertoonde lezing-performance Buñuel, en guerra overschouwt Paco Cao het leven van Luis Buñuel. Cao zoomt daarbij in op Buñuels korte doortocht in het MoMA (New York).

Er bestaat namelijk geen twijfel over: Luis Buñuel heeft bij het MoMA gewerkt, meer bepaald als raadgever en eindredacteur van het "Office of Coordinator of Inter-American Affairs". Nog enkele feiten: Buñuel is in Brussel op zoek gegaan naar geschikte locaties voor zijn film El Ángel Exterminador en heeft een recept voor Martini Dry samengesteld dat je zeker eens moet proberen. Paco Cao leert ons leven en werk van Buñuel kennen, door een grondige analyse van allerlei historische documenten en met een zelden vertoond biografisch perspectief. Samen met Pablo Gómez Sala en Rachel Babruskinas blaast hij de historisch strakke performance op tot een unieke lezing- performance, op maat gemaakt voor de tentoonstelling El Ángel Exterminador in het Paleis voor Schone Kunsten.


WHO'S PACO CAO ?!
Central to Paco Cao’s work is his interest in art action. Primarily concerned with creating a relationship with the spectator, the core mission of all his works, most of Paco Cao’s actions are driven by communication and surprise and based on the use of mass media. His documentation of processes of bureaucratic red tape and the construction of identity also play a major role in his work. Between his early poster announcing Paco Cao ha muerto (Paco Cao is dead) in 1989, and his latest forages into dance which have led to a featurelength film, he moved to New York, where he developed a seminal project he had begun in Spain, in which he literally hires out his body Rent a Body (1993-1996), or Border (1995-ongoing), where he expands the limits and meaning of the body as an artwork. One of Cao’s most significant interventions is related with the work on display in this exhibition. After an exhaustive study of some artworks, Cao decided to
look for people physically resembling the characters in a number of famous paintings. He wanted the people responding to his actions to shed their cloak of anonymity and to become something artistic. To achieve this end, he announced a competition and, with the support of an advertising campaign and media attention from newspapers and magazines, he created a parody of our society. While what the art world values most is the consideration of the artwork as something material and apolitical, Paco Cao’s work ironically inverts those premises with the aid of documentation which, in his case, is essential in carrying out long-term projects bringing to the fore the constitution of the self in a culture constantly exposed to the spectacle.